Hello Everyone

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TurboAndy
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Joined: 11/07/2018 - 00:51
Hello Everyone

Hi there Im Andy and I’m new to the club. 

Ive just been given a Webb 24 mower by my uncle.

It’s in full working order. Has had a new engine not too long ago. 

Any idea of what date roughly of manufacture it could possibly be? Also what paint colour it is. It’s a fairly light green, belt driven and has the metal grass box if that helps. 

 

Also does anyone know where I could get a new belt cover and grass box?

 

thanks. 

Clive1997
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Joined: 14/10/2010 - 20:41
Hi Andy

Hi Andy

 

Welcome to the forum, I have a bit of info around somewhere for the mower manuals brochures etc, believe its 60's/70's will see what I can find.

I do have a good later black rubber box for a 24in Webb in good condition, perhaps let me know how yours fits & I will check its the same,

 

 

wristpin
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Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
When that model was first

When that model was first introduced in the 1950s it had a Villiers lightweight engine, then a Tecumseh  H4 and finally a 5HP Briggs.

Its direct competitor at the time was the chain driven  Atco 24 and a lot of people preferred the Atco due to it not having belts . However, as someone who has sold, serviced and owned both I preferred the Webb as it was a "softer" machine to drive and protected the cutting cylinder from impact damage. It possibly gained a bad reputation for eating belts but that was down to owners and people in the trade, who should have known better, not setting them up properly and keeping them in adjustment. I used to mow nearly half an acre with one and a set of belts would last me one and a half to two mowing seasons. As well as adjustment it was essential to buy quality cotton covered belts and always change them as a pair. - Dawson Speedona was a good make at the time. If you need any advice re setting up the belts, do ask.

The steel box was prone to damage and rusting but I preferred them to the plastics as they were lighter. If you do go the plastic route it is essential that you have the supporting hoop or the lower mounting hooks will tear out of the plastic. 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tdcmafhuajgamw5/Webb%2024%20brochure0001.pdf?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/jgelbktgwgc4kk4/Webb%2024%20271%20Owners%20Man...

 

TurboAndy
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Last seen: 2 months 1 week ago
Joined: 11/07/2018 - 00:51
Hi and thanks for the replies

Hi and thanks for the replies. 

 

Thank you for the offer of the box but I’d like to keep it as original as I can. I know it hasn’t got the correct engine but nothing I can do about that. I had no idea it was as old as it is. 

Id appropriate any advice on setting up the belts please. 

 

Thank you. 

wristpin
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Last seen: 11 hours 56 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
I'd appreciate  any advice on

I'd appreciate  any advice on setting up the belts please.

First , dating your mower. If the seat is the same age as the mower the machine is not a very early one as they had Brooks bicycle saddles and not bucket seats.

Belts.

All comments are with the drive engaged ie the belts under tension.

Sheet 1. As shown with keeper A at the 3 o'clock position, is wrong, should be at about 2 o'clock and just clear of the belts when under tension. I know that the 2 o'clock position looks wrong for the shape of the keeper but the belts must not touch the keeper when engaged.

Keeper D. Again just clear when under tension

Keeper C. just clear etc. 

B. The oil hole in the Jockey pulley guide plate is correctly positioned but often you will find that after a belt change the pulley has been replaced back to front with its oil hole in its boss inaccessible.

Sheet 2

A. The bush that connects the two jockey pulley support arms should be free to pivot around bolt B. In fact, if assembled correctly there is usually an oil hole visible.  If neglected the bush seizes on the bolt and when the clutch lever is operated, tends to try and turn it. The result is a lazy return to the clutch or a sheared bolt. A quick test is to put a finger on the bolt head and operate the clutch. If you feel any movement it is starting to seize. Try forcing penetrating oil through the oil hole; otherwise its a strip down job. 

 

Worth checking

Sheet 3

On the outer end of each back roller are the ratchet drive mechanisms. They are each supported by four shouldered studs B screwed into the end of the rollers and the whole lot covered by "tin can" covers secured by nuts. Those studs do tend to work loose and left unattended to will strip the thread in the rollers - a major pain. All those parts are getting difficult to find so it's worth keeping an eye on things. 

A quick test is to block under each chassis side plate so that the rollers are off the ground and turn each roller in the forward direction. You should hear the two ratchet pawls clicking. if they don't the roller if they don't the pawls are either seized on the studs or the springs are broken. Turn the rollers the other way and they should lock and try to turn the drive mechanism.

Finally (for now!!)

If you have the belts correctly set but while you are emptying the grass box, the mower is trying to move or at the worst, there's smoke coming off the belts, you have a worn handlebar clutch lever.  Two points of wear. The pivot between the main lever and the clamp bracket. Drill oversize and fit a suitable plain shank bolt. The second is more tricky - the anvil that the locking trigger latches to is worn and although when you squeeze the lever back to the handlebar, the belts are disengaged, relaxing your grip allows the lever forward to find the worn locking point, and the belts start to engage.

Other than a new lever, there is a not too difficult fix for that. A job for another day! 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tfdvuuh32h8uyww/Webb%2024%20belt%20adjustment0...

TurboAndy
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Joined: 11/07/2018 - 00:51
That’s brilliant. Thanks ever

That’s brilliant. Thanks ever so much for all the help and information. 

 

Andy.