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Collection, Preservation and Display of Old Lawn Mowers

Suffolk Super Colt - HT lead access / replacement

I finally joined the forums this weekend after reading this very useful site for several years.

I pulled out my trusty Suffolk this weekend ready for the first cut of the year, gave it an oil change, refitted and back-lapped the cylinder blade and was unable to start the engine (it almost ran briefly after numerous tries).

After a bit of digging, I've found that I'm lacking a spark.  I've given the points a clean and now get an occasional weak spark (sometimes even a few) when I turn it over holding the lead near the casing.

I'm hoping this is a problem with the lead and not something more significant, but I can't seem to fathom out how to get access to the flywheel end of the cable. I've loosened the reverse-thread nut, but can't seem to shift the flywheel.  I'm guessing I need a flywheel puller?  Not quite sure what these do, or how I use one though.  I did see two screws on the side though (see pictures) and wondered if it comes apart in two pieces?  I looked at the manual, but I couldn't be sure from the diagram.

Would someone be able to tell me (a) how I get to the inner HT lead connection? (b) how it's connected - i.e. does it just unscrew like the suppressor end? (c) Where I'd get a replacement cable if that's what's required - the current lead allows me to screw the original suppressor straight in - I'm guessing I need a special cable for that?

Pics of flywheel and associated screws shown below.  For info, it's a Suffolk Super Colt, bought new in the mid-late 1970s and pretty much all original.

Flywheel 

Many thanks in advance.

 

 

Forums

wristpin Mon, 05/04/2021

Yes, you do need a puller which need be nothing more complicated than a thick metal strip with two holes drilled through it to match the two threaded holes in the flywheel centre and a couple of UNC threaded bolts - I think you will find the size embossed on the flywheel.

BUT, before you do that go back to the points and make sure that they are really clean. Did you pull a bit of clean paper through them after setting the gap with a possibly greasy feeler gauge?  However, cleaning and setting the points is a lot easier with the flywheel removed.

 

DFulton Mon, 05/04/2021

Many thanks - I didn't actually adjust the points - just cleaned with emery paper, but maybe I'll try that first (that's just the screws you can see through the window isn't it?).

What are the two screws on the circumference of the flywheel for? Do I need to remove those before I attempt to take the flywheel off the shaft, or are they OK to leave?

wristpin Mon, 05/04/2021

Screws around the circumference . Leave them alone!

Your emery may have left gritty muck behind on the points so put a piece of clean paper between the points, turn the engine until the points just grab it, pull it through but not out. Turn again to Open the points to release it . Pulling it right out while clamped by the points can result in fibres of paper being left behind.

 

DFulton Mon, 05/04/2021

Many thanks for the help - you've saved me a job!  It took a lot of the afternoon (and several new swear words - especially when I discovered I'd disconnected the regulator after I'd bolted all the cowling back on), but about an hour ago, it actually started and ran.  Now I just need to work out the cause of the smoking exhaust...

wristpin Mon, 05/04/2021

Whiteish smoke, burning oil. Black smoke, over rich fuel mixture, carb flooding or air filter choked.

DJD Tue, 06/04/2021

White smoke (or steam) is condensation in my experience, blue is oil being burned, surely? 

wristpin Tue, 06/04/2021

White smoke (or steam) is condensation in my experience, blue is oil being burned, surely? 

A matter of perception and how long it goes on for? One could add the distincive smell of burnt oil.

DFulton Tue, 06/04/2021

It's more white than blue and it varies with revs.  More of a petrol smell than burnt oil, I'd say.

I've had it before when it's been idling while I empty the grass box and then I've revved the throttle.  That usually clears pretty quickly.  I need to give it a decent warm up to see if it goes away this time.  It was the first run after months in the garage.  May have to wait until the weekend to try it properly (or at least until the snow / hail goes away again!).

DFulton Fri, 09/04/2021

Solved the smoke issue too - when I originally tipped it up to sharpen the blades, oil leaked out the back.  I hadn't realised at the time, but it had gone into the muffler in a big way.  When investigating the source of the smoke, I took off the muffler (which visibly dripped oil) and the smoke production pretty much stopped.

So, is my muffler now ruined, or is there some way I can clean it out?  There was no significant difference in volume when it was removed, so I suspect it's not been working terribly well for a long time anyway.

wristpin Fri, 09/04/2021

Just work the machine good and hard and it will shift it but if you want to hurry the process , take it off and cook it with a blow torch. Suppose that you could dunk it in solvent to wash it out but working it hard is probably all that is needed.

wristpin Fri, 09/04/2021

Just work the machine good and hard and it will shift it but if you want to hurry the process , take it off and cook it with a blow torch. Suppose that you could dunk it in solvent to wash it out but working it hard is probably all that is needed.